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"Love on The Bachelor, though arrived at through a set of unreal circumstances, is real—just like falling in love on vacation is real, like falling in love over a semester abroad is real—if only for the duration of the show itself.”
Sam Eichner on real love, reality TV, and the hyperreal transgressions of Juan Pablo, now at Blunderbuss Magazine.

“Their apartment was post-war, tell-me-about-your-mother-while-you-finish-that-cigarette, psychoanalyst chic.”

—   Ramona is subpoenaed to dinner at her boss’ house in this new flash fiction from Emma Harper, up now at Blunderbuss Magazine.

“What might Job have thought of the many doctors who,
when commanded by Franco’s men, took hundreds
of newborn babies from their mothers as they trembled
on the delivery table.”

—   Three poems from Joanne Diaz, up now at Blunderbuss Magazine.

“Every word I say contributes to the lie of art, Young said.”

—   Joe Miller on minimalist legend La Monte Young, up now at Blunderbuss Magazine.

“It’s exceptionally difficult to explain to a badge what’s decent about mad ramblings. Hell, maybe nothing is. Maybe that’s what makes them decent.”

—   From Chris Tirrell’s new short story “In the Midst,” up now at Blunderbuss Magazine.
"In one kind of past, this was one kind of future."
MC Hyland mines the poetic potential of silent film, now at Blunderbuss Magazine.
It’s Memorial Day weekend! Time to celebrate with LSD, the Main Street Electrical Parade, Beethoven, and domestic terrorism! All this & more can be found in “Requiem,” a new short story from Doug Weaver.Art by Yvonne Martinez.
"Compared to the esoteric medical treatments you endured for the past six days, this final procedure is sensibly named: The Last Breath."
From “Seven Days After Father,” Essay Liu’s personal story of grief and ritual in rural Taiwan. Translated & illustrated by Kevin TS Tang.

"Compared to the esoteric medical treatments you endured for the past six days, this final procedure is sensibly named: The Last Breath."

From “Seven Days After Father,” Essay Liu’s personal story of grief and ritual in rural Taiwan.

Translated & illustrated by Kevin TS Tang.

What does “The Americans” have to do with time travel, Felicity, and political imagination?

More than you think. A new essay by Sam Ross at Blunderbuss Magazine:

"There’s every argument to be made that the ghost of Felicity Porter (played by Russell on the WB from 1998-2002) was exorcised back in season one when Elizabeth savagely beat the KGB handler she suspected of betrayal, screaming, ‘Show them your face! Show it to them!’ There’s no going back to Dean & Deluca and Heather Nova-ridden mixtapes after that. Still, if The Americans is Russell’s best work to date, there is no escaping the fact that it is a career re-defining performance. Hard then for some of us to completely keep out of mind the hours spent on Tuesday evenings at the turn of the millennium watching very young twenty-somethings spill their hearts all over each other.”
"The Walrus asked if this missing person had Down syndrome and was I his caretaker? I’m his Job Coach, I said, and he’s hardly a missing person. I only misplaced him five minutes ago!"
From “Young Chul Kim,” a new short story by Eliza Kostelanetz Schrader, only at Blunderbuss Magazine.
Art by Yvonne Martinez.